What you should know about lead-based paint removalLead-based paint in a home can cause a variety of neurological problems in children and adults. Dust from the paint settles around the home, easily transferring to families and triggering health problems over time. Lead paint was not completely banned in the United States until 1978. Before then, it was used in more than 38 million homes.

If you are planning to renovate a home that was built before 1978, you are required by federal law to receive a copy of the EPA’s lead pamphlet. Lead poses a serious health risk and must be dealt with safely and carefully. Trust EXOVATIONS’ certified contractors to remove lead-based paint from your home.

Does My House Have Lead Paint?

If your home was built before 1978, you should contact EXOVATIONS for qualified professionals to inspect your home. The older your house is, the more likely its paint is lead-based.

Lead Paint in American Homes:

  • 24% of homes built between 1960 – 1977
  • 69% of homes built between 1940 – 1959
  • 87% of homes built before 1940

Lead paint that is cracking, chipping or peeling is especially dangerous as poisonous lead dust spreads through the air. If you think your home might have lead paint, contact a professional for a paint inspection and risk assessment.

How Do I Remove Lead Paint?

EXOVATIONS is an EPA-certified lead-safe renovator. Our team of professionals are specially trained to bring homes up-to-code and keep families safe from the dangerous effects of lead poisoning. After confirming that paint in your home is lead-based, contact us to schedule an appointment.

Is My Renovator Certified?

In order to ensure the safety and health of families and workers affected by lead paint, any contractor working on buildings before 1978 must receive 8 hours of training by an EPA-accredited provider. In the program, contractors learn the proper safety measures to contain lead dust and remove hazardous paint.

Training costs $200 – $400 per trainee plus a $300 certification fee. Fines for violating the RRP Rule, however, can reach $37,500 per incident. Getting certified is not just a financially smart thing for a contracting firm to do, but it is an ethically important step to protecting the safety of workers and families across the country. EXOVATIONS is proud to be an EPA-certified firm.

What Precautions Do Certified Contractors Take?

Every site with potential lead-based paint must be overseen by certified contractors. When working with lead paint, contractors must quarantine the area with heavy plastic and proper warning signs. Dust-minimizing practices include wet sanding, mopping and vacuuming with a HEPA vacuum.

EXOVATIONS’ staff is proud to be one hundred percent compliant with EPA standards and U.S. law. Our certified contractors treat homes with lead paint with absolute care and precision, ensuring the safety of all of the families we work with. For trusted lead paint removal and renovation, contact us today.

For more information on lead safety, visit the EPA’s lead page.

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